Tag Archives: pride

A Tale of Two People

this is a poem I wrote some time ago for TPS English 3, and because I’m in the mood to post something random, I’m posting this. =P It’s actually very pathetic; keep in mind I wrote about one-and-a-half years ago.  And I’m not going to bother editing it in any way, so don’t judge the punctuation or anything.

Once in a land that was hilly

Lived a fellow who thought himself dandy

Folks considered him silly

Because he ate so much candy

And he often would sing ‘pick-a-dilly!’

Whenever the brandy was handy.

 

Not far away, in the same land

Ventured a girl who was buff

She hated to be still and be fanned

But people just thought she was rough

Said she: “You folks are so weak and so bland

But I know that I’m made of stern stuff.”

 

On a day that was real sweet and shady

The dandy decided to tease

He saw the brave girl and said: “Lady!

Just give me a kiss, if you please!”

She screeched: “I’ll punch you o’er to Haiti!

I’ll lop off your head, you big sleaze!”

 

He laughed a great “hee!” and laughed a great “ha!”

She scowled: “I’ll turn you to ice

And put you where you’ll never thaw.”

“Oh, gee,” mocked he, “that’s not very nice.”

“I’ll grind you like meat that is raw!”,

She quipped, with a look that would shrivel lice.

 

He had fair warning and did not heed

And that’s when she got out her mace

He was so scared that he started to plead,

“Now, keep that thing out of my face!”

The poor fellow shook like a reed

She paused: “Well, I might offer grace.”

 

She cleared her throat: “Say you’re sorry.”

At him, the girl stared with a glare:

“And don’t take it back on-the-morry!”

He nodded his head and ran like a hare

Then he took off in his Ferrari

And the girl rode away on her mare.

Advertisements

J11- The Dump Truck

this little story is so oft repeated in my family, that the term “broken dump truck” is somewhat iconic and is an instant trigger for laughter.

My annoying older brother had pushed me over the edge with his taunting. I wouldn’t take it any longer. I’d show him!

“You, you—you broken dump truck!” I forcefully yelled the unique insult.

I was angry. And I was five.

Thankfully, things have changed a bit since those days. For one, my vocabulary of insults now extends beyond the ones I come up with on the spot. Also, these days my brother and I—me in my teens and he in his twenties—tend towards playful teasing and poking rather than futile shouting matches.

However, it seems like some things never change. People still annoy me, and I still have the temptation to let my temper get the best of me. I think it’s just part of human nature that as we live together, we agitate each other. Even among more even-tempered people (which I freely admit I am not), confrontation will come about eventually. And when it does, we have to ask ourselves if we’re prepared to let go of a little pride in order to have peace. After all, no one likes being called a dump truck, broken or otherwise. Plus, a little patience goes a long way. Proverbs 15:1, “A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.”


CW4- The Pig Who Ate Crow

i still don’t know how i produced such a bizarre story. Ok, ok,  i do know: combine a late-night game of pictionary with friends, and my favorite childhood song. Voíla.

 

  Once upon a Time there lived a Boar. But seriously, he did live on Time—2409 Time Avenue, Alta City. Now, Boar had a big problem in his life. According to the hog, his problem was really annoying neighbors. According to his neighbors, Boar’s problem was simply his unbearable pride.

  On one particularly aggravating day, Boar felt as if he could take the antics of his neighbors no longer. Why, just that morning, Cat had been singing while she swept her porch—“Dreadful noise,” Boar called it. Then that horrid, elderly, speckled Owl decided to shout, “Good morning, Boar!” at the top of his lungs. Clearly, that was too much for anyone to handle, and Boar angrily told himself that he would devour the very next person who dared to disturb his day. It so happened that as Boar walked to town — he just had to buy some new duds, after all, that’s the whole purpose of money— Crow came strolling the opposite direction, singing his favorite song. For the sake of the reputation of crows, it must be noted that this particular Crow wasn’t very bright. Most crows are highly intelligent, however, and would never sing such a random, childish song as this Crow had the gumption to belt out:

“Little Bunny Foo Foo

Hoppin’ through the forest

Scoopin’ up the field mice

And boppin’ ‘em on the head.”

  Now, it is quite likely that even a civil person would have been irritated by the harsh cawing and the somewhat disturbing ditty, but you see, Boar was no civil person. The haughty creature went berserk, and in mere moments poor Crow was staring down the throat of the enraged hog about to consume him. As soon as he had committed the heinous crime, Boar realized why the term ‘to eat crow’ is not a positive one; he coughed and spluttered as he exclaimed aloud, “That was entirely revolting!”  

  From that day on, the humbled boar found himself eager to please his neighbors, and he never lost his temper. Everyone around him attested that he was, indeed, a changed hog. As for the collateral which took the form of Crow’s demise—well, no one really cared.

Moral of the Story: Crow is every bit as disgusting as it sounds, so if you’d rather not eat it, then don’t be a pompous, prideful pig. That is to say, stay humble, and put others before yourself.

Alternative Moral: Don’t be a dumb crow.